Finger Joint Risk When Using A Computer Mouse

Finger PIP joint
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We all know that working with a computer involves the risk of complaints in neck, arm, shoulders, hand and fingers.

So, did you know that there’s one finger joint you use most when scrolling and clicking? It incurs a serious risk of injury.
The joint is called the pip or proximal inter phalangeal joint.
Rather than as a simple hinge joint, we should regard it as a functional complex and beautiful assembly.

Just look at it and you will realize how vulnerable it is. The individual bones which make up the joint are only connected by tendons and bands.

When we use a regular computer mouse or most of the so called ergonomic mice, this happens: the loads in tendons and bands, incurred to stabilize the joint, when hovering the fingers over the buttons, may cause a lot of unnecessary strain.
To prevent this, we need to support the fingers. A contour which provides support while fingers are relaxed is what we want to see.
The HandShoe Mouse has been designed to provide such support. It allows fingers and hand to relax in a comfortable position.
Just put your hand on the body of the HandShoe Mouse and you’ll feel what we mean.

This video shows it all:

The End of Keyboard Trays and Mouse Platforms?

By: Paul H.

I think we all enjoyed the innovations presented during this year’s Ergo Expo in Las Vegas.

Of course various new innovative products were presented next to already well known products which are from the outset near to the optimal solution. These can therefore hardly be improved, because they have been developed based on medical research, like for example the HandShoe Mouse by Hippus.

A very obvious difference with previous shows was, as far as I have noted, the absence of keyboard trays with mouse platforms. Apparently the industry has seen the light.
Instead we now see a multitude of height adjustable desks.
These desks not only provides sufficient space to work, but, far more important, they allow you to support the forearm and thereby relax the Trapezius – and Deep Neck muscles.

Already in 2006, Professor Han Ming Chen addressed this point in his paper: The effect on forearm and shoulder muscle activity in using different slanted computer mice, published in Clinical Biomechanics.

Height Adjustable Desks: Free Movement

adjustable deskThe space provided by height adjustable desks allows free movement. One can sit far more comfortable and move keyboard and mouse around to ones heart’s content.
We are not robots, we should allow ourselves freedom of movement.
Also paperwork can now be readily available on the desk. And there is also plenty of room for your HandShoe Mouse!

The adjustable desk takes away the restriction of the cramped space dictated by the concept of the keyboard tray. Long and behold, we now even see micro desks to further increase the available desk space.

I hope that based on anatomical and bio-mechanical research the ergonomics industry will realize that concepts from the past do not always comply with the best solution. The keyboard tray was a perceived good alternative. However, everybody realized that restrictions prevailed. The adjustable desk and chair now provide a fitting solution based on fundamental scientific research.

Why The HandShoe Mouse Has No Thumb Buttons

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handshoe mouse no thumb buttons

Many times we have been asked why the HandShoe Mouse does not have switch buttons under the thumb.

Well, there is a reason: the thumb is restricted in its motion possibilities. Repetitive thumb motions to activate such buttons could thus lead to inflammation. We have therefore decided not to incorporate any thumb buttons in the truly ergonomic HandShoe Mouse.

Do You Suffer From “Gamers Thumb”?

An already well known discomfort as a result of unnatural motions required to operate thumb buttons is the so called gamers thumb or SMS thumb.
Various studies have shown that repetitive motions of the thumb may lead to irritation.
Muscles control tendons which slide backwards and forwards through a tunnel.
To allow these tendons to move without friction the human body produces a slippery substance.

Inflammation

Excessive gripping and pinching, required to control these thumb buttons, may cause inflammation.
As a result this slippery substance deteriorates, and gets watery. The smooth sliding action of the tendons is then hampered.

This will cause pain, tenderness, swelling over the thumb side of the wrist and difficulty gripping.

We’re showing this all in a one minute video: