What Causes Mouse Pain?

This one minute video shows you clearly why you get pain in your hand and fingers when using a conventional computer mouse.  The HandShoe Mouse provides full support for your hand and prevents gripping and pinching. That’s exactly what makes the difference with a standard mouse.

Finger Joint Risk When Using A Computer Mouse

Finger PIP joint
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We all know that working with a computer involves the risk of complaints in neck, arm, shoulders, hand and fingers.

So, did you know that there’s one finger joint you use most when scrolling and clicking? It incurs a serious risk of injury.
The joint is called the pip or proximal inter phalangeal joint.
Rather than as a simple hinge joint, we should regard it as a functional complex and beautiful assembly.

Just look at it and you will realize how vulnerable it is. The individual bones which make up the joint are only connected by tendons and bands.

When we use a regular computer mouse or most of the so called ergonomic mice, this happens: the loads in tendons and bands, incurred to stabilize the joint, when hovering the fingers over the buttons, may cause a lot of unnecessary strain.
To prevent this, we need to support the fingers. A contour which provides support while fingers are relaxed is what we want to see.
The HandShoe Mouse has been designed to provide such support. It allows fingers and hand to relax in a comfortable position.
Just put your hand on the body of the HandShoe Mouse and you’ll feel what we mean.

This video shows it all:

Causes of Mouse Pain

mouse pain

When we think of pain, we think of broken bones and the muscle pains of professional athletes. We also think of people who do hard physical work. In this age of technology, however, there are many others suffering from severe pain.

Hand and Wrist Complaints

More and more computer users are suffering from hand and wrist complaints caused by extensive use of a regular computer mouse. Research into this issue was done by Erasmus University in the Netherlands who identified a number of key causes of these complaints. One example is gripping and pinching of a regular mouse, while holding it but a standard mouse is often too small for the hand. This can cause tension and pain as far away as the shoulder and neck.

Mouse Pain From Hovering

Another common cause is what we call hovering, when a person’s fingers hover above the mouse buttons to prevent inadvertent clicking. This creates tension on finger and arm muscles, which can again cause pain all the way up to the neck. Lastly, a vertical mouse forces the hand in an upright position, the two major bones in the arm are then parallel to one another. This causes serious muscle strain and may lead to RSI.